South Shore Equine Clinic & Diagnostic Center
Equine Veterinary Services South Shore Boston Massachusetts

Subscribe To Our Email Newsletter Subscribe To Our Email Newsletter
Subscribe To Our Email Newsletter Subscribe To Our Email Newsletter

Become a fan of South Shore Equine Clinic on Facebook

 

 

Bits & Pieces:April 2007

Annual Exam by Your Veterinarian

Vaccination Schedule & Coggins Testing

Deworming Program

Dental Care & Performance Dentistry

Hoof Care

News

Inside SSEC

Believe it or not, Spring is finally here!  It's time to take off the snow shoes, put away the winter blankets and get your horse ready for the show season and other summer activities!!  A good health care program is an important part of maintaining a happy, healthy horse and should include the following:

Annual Exam by Your Veterinarian

This is your veterinarians chance to go over your horse, perform soundness evaluations, check his or her teeth, and possibly  detect subtle heart or respiratory problems. This is also your opportunity to ask questions about preventative care for your horse.

Back to Top

Vaccination Schedule & Coggins Testing

At SSEC we split vaccine appointments into two or three visits at least two weeks apart so we do not overload your horse’s immune system and ensure he mounts the best immune response possible. As in humans, vaccination does not guarantee 100% protection; our hope is that it will decrease the severity of disease or limit its spread if contracted by your horse or a horse in the barn.  A coggins test is a blood test (for Equine Infectious Anemia) and is required annually in the state of Massachusetts.

Back to Top

Deworming Program

All horses on the premises should be dewormed every 6-8 weeks if on a rotating paste schedule; or they should be on a daily feed through with semi-annual dosing with an ivermectin. ALL horses on the premises should be on the SAME deworming schedule to successfully control the parasite population on that farm.

Back to Top

Dental Care & Performance Dentistry

Most horses require teeth floating once to twice yearly.  Their teeth, unlike ours, continue to grow throughout life and they develop very sharp edges which can  cause cheek and tongue lacerations; lead to improper chewing and malocclusions, weight loss, bit interference and TMJ pain. SSEC practices performance dentistry -  floating the mouth to maximize the performance of that horse - both in mastication and when ridden.  We use this term to differentiate from the practice of simple removal of sharp points as performed by lay dentists.  It includes examination of the head and evaluation of incisor and molar occlusion using a full mouth speculum. A full mouth speculum is essential for identification and treatment of dental problems.  Power tools are also used for most dental procedures.  They enable work to be done quicker, easier and with less trauma to oral soft tissues and teeth. 

Back to Top

Hoof Care

All horses should have their feet trimmed every 5-8 weeks to prevent cracking of the walls and maintain balance of the joints. We offer consultations with Dr. Steve O'Grady, a veterinarian who is also an accomplished farrier and a leading expert in the field of equine podiatry. He will meet with you, your horse and your farrier to discuss and implement a shoeing/treatment plan.

Back to Top

News

Congratulations

Doctors Reilly and Cimetti were both recently honored with Meritorious Service Awards from the Massachusetts Veterinary Medical Association at the annual Celebrate Veterinarians! Event, held at The Westin Hotel in Waltham, MA.  They were recognized for their volunteer work with Project Samana in the Dominican Republic.  Dr. Reilly has made annual trips since 1996, and Dr. Cimetti has been volunteering since 2001. The trip includes castrating mules, donkeys, and horses; advising the local horsemen on issues such as saddle sores, foot problems, nutrition, and infectious diseases.  The equine population on the Samana peninsula now enjoys deworming 4 times a year, something which had not been done until recently.  Project Samana is a non-profit volunteer mission sponsored by the Massachusetts Veterinary Medical Association (MVMA).  Please contact our office if you would like further information on how to help.

Back to Top

Pre-purchase Exams at SSEC

No more waiting!! The decision of purchasing a horse can be an exciting, yet stressful time, especially when you are waiting for the vet to call with the x-ray and blood work results. Pre-purchase exams performed at the clinic; allow critical evaluation of the horse in hand and under saddle on a myriad of surfaces. Blood work, digital radiographs, endoscopy, and ultrasound exams, if indicated, can be performed here while you wait. In minutes you will have test results and hopefully all the information you need to make that important decision. You will leave with a copy of your digital x-rays, blood work, and a letter outlining the findings. 

Back to Top

Inside SSEC

We are please to announce that we now offer LASER SURGERY.  Dr. Reilly and Dr. Cimetti have been using the carbon dioxide laser since the clinic opened, but have recently added a diode laser for endoscopic procedures that can be performed in a standing, sedated horse. 

LASER surgery has several benefits over traditional scalpel surgery, including reduced pain, less bleeding and swelling, and generally faster recovery times.

We are also excited to offer PLATELET RICH PLASMA INJECTIONS, also known as PRP.  Platelets are known for their role in clotting. They also release powerful substances and growth factors that mediate inflammation, stimulate cell regeneration, reduce scar formation and promote tissue repair. In humans, there are reports of pain relief with its use in tendon and ligament injuries.  PRP is used to jump-start healing and accelerate tissue regeneration in skin, soft tissue, and bone. The enhanced healing response ultimately improves the quality of tissue repair, improves the prognosis for return to performance, and decreases the incidence of re-injury.   PRP is particularly beneficial in treating injuries in areas of limited blood flow and is used in horses to treat ligament and tendon injuries, eye ulcers, and skin wounds. 

Back to Top